BC’s Lieutenant Governor Launches Canoe He Carved Himself

Wednesday, 14 April 2010
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British Columbia Lieutenant Governor, Steven Point and his carved canoe. Photo Credit: Adrian Lam, Times Colonist

“It was a great, great feeling”

That’s what British Columbia Lieutenant Governor, Steven Point said when he got back to shore after paddling his canoe for the first time.

You see, his canoe is a bit different than what’s sitting currently in your garage in that it’s hand carved from a log that Steven found on a beach he found himself near his beach.

[blockquote]After months of carving, Point, B.C.'s first aboriginal lieutenant governor, officially launched a canoe yesterday from the same beach where he found the log from which it was made. It was a ceremony marked by the story of the canoe and traditional blessings, chants and drumming.

"When you work so hard on a project like this, to see it come to completion is just an amazing feeling. There's gratitude and happiness. It's a great honour to paddle this canoe." Point carved the canoe with help from celebrated First Nations master carver Chief Tony Hunt, working in an old garage behind Government House.[/blockquote]

British Columbia Lieutenant Governor, Steven Point launching his carved canoe. Photo Credit: Adrian Lam, Times Colonist

What is going to happen to the canoe now that it is done? It’s going to be given to the people of British Columbia.

"The idea of this unity canoe project is diversity and reconciliation for while I'm lieutenant governor," Point said.

He named the canoe Shxwtitöstel, which means a safe place to cross the river.

More info: timescolonist.com
Photo credits: Adrian Lam, Times Colonist


David Johnston

David Johnston

David Johnston has been introducing people to the sport of sea kayaking for the past 15 years. He is a senior instructor trainer with Paddle Canada and teaches for several paddling schools in Ontario, Canada. Full Bio.

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