From the YouTube description:

Maritime New Zealand's (MNZ's) new advertising campaign harks back to the glory days of 1980s cop shows to show that, like bulletproof vests, lifejackets don't save people's lives unless they're worn. Police officers Brandon Reynolds & Joe Lyons head to the docks for a bust. Things don't go as planned...

The campaign draws on MNZ's latest research, which shows that men aged 40 plus are the least likely to zip up on the water. Black humour and '80s TV show nostalgia are used to deliver the deadly message that having a lifejacket on board won't save boaties or their mates if things go wrong. Being close to your lifejacket is like being close to your bulletproof vest -- it's just not close enough. People think if they have an accident, they'll have time to put their lifejacket on, but boating tragedies tell a different story....

For more information about summer boating safety, visit maritimenz.govt.nz/lifejackets

And for good measure here is the Starsky and Hutch opening that made me want to be a cop so bad…

Published in Safety
Thursday, 16 January 2014 10:40

Amazing Film: The Waters of Greenstone

Shot over a period of three weeks around the South Island of New Zealand, you know that place where they shot those movies. Yeah, those ones. This film highlights some of the amazing scenery found in and around the Catlins Forest Park, Fiordland NP, Queenstown, Mount Aspiring NP, Mount Cook NP, Arthurs Pass NP and Castle Hill Reserve.

Just how awesome would this film be if every water shot had a kayak or canoe in it? Super awesome.

Published in General News

It’s never a good sign when rescue officials refer to you in the local paper paper as, "incredibly under prepared, inexperienced and did everything wrong."

This comment was dished out by Senior Sergeant Luke Shadbolt after the Lowe Corporation Rescue Helicopter in New Zealand had to go and pick up a father and son duo that planned to paddle down a 60km section of the Tutaekuri River . The pair thought it would taken them 5-7 hours to complete.

"They were located near the Maungatutu end [of the river], having travelled about 5km in 24 hours. The planned trip was about 60km long on the river which has a low water flow at this time of year and is not normally suitable for this type of kayak trip.

"With their speed of travel it would have taken about five days to cover the distance they intended and that would have involved a lot of walking."

The article also made a summary of some of their other mistakes:

  • The pair wore light clothing and were poorly equipped to stay out overnight.
  • They were wearing life jackets but had no means of emergency communication.
  • A cellphone they took with them was "useless" as the area had no coverage.

You can read the full story here.

Photo credit: Martin Cathrae - Creative Commons

Published in General News

Tim Taylor paddling in New Zealand. Photo credit: nzkayaker.com

I feel terrible for Tim Taylor. Looks like he had to put his expedition with the goal to kayak around New Zealand on hold for the next couple of months. Things had been going pretty good for the past seven months and 4700km (of 5500km) when he got stuck for two and a half weeks at Ahipara waiting for the seas to calm down.

Published in Trips
A free trip for two to a spectacular New Zealand merino ranch is being offered online until Dec. 28, 2008 at www.Icebreaker.com.
Published in Press Releases
Here is a little tip to all of you young kids who get into trouble on the water and look to get rescued. When a boat stops by to pick you up, don't spend the whole time worrying about the cost of the rescue. Oh yes, when you get back on shore make sure you thank your rescuers or else you will look like a big jerk.

That is exactly what happened to a German tourist in New Zealand. While paddling back to the launch site, currents caused him to flip over. A fishing boat stopped by to help but he hesitated as he was worried that the rescue was going to cost to much.
Published in Funny
Andrew McAuley
Andrew McAuley
New Zealand Coroner, Trevor Savage has released his report today from the inquest into the tragic death of Australian kayaker Andrew McAuley during his ill-fated voyage across the Tasman Sea.

Since they never recovered the body of Andrew and it would be impossible to pinpoint exactly how he died; the inquest mainly focused on what happened after the emergency call was received the New Zealand Rescue Coordination Centre.
Published in Safety
Wednesday, 16 January 2008 11:37

Kayakers' terror as hungry sharks circle

Daniel Pennington paddles for his life off Great Barrier Island with a shark in pursuit.
Daniel Pennington paddles for his life off Great Barrier Island with a shark in pursuit.
Daniel Pennington and his 22-year-old friend Dean Woodgate got the scare of their life back about a month ago when they were out kayaking off Great Barrier Island in New Zealand.

Things were going well when about ½ way through their day paddle a 2m shark decided to chase a fishing lure that Daniel had been towing.

"It was dead calm and very glassy. It was a beautiful day ... then Dean saw this fin come up behind my rudder, just like you see in Jaws, like slowly just coming out of the water. He yelled out and I looked behind my kayak and could see this big fin. It was following me and I wanted to get rid of the lure [even though] it was too close to be going for my lure."

After paddling away, Mr Pennington slowly came to a halt and the shark, which was about 2m long, disappeared under the water.

"Meanwhile a bigger shark [around 4m] appeared so I paddled over to Dean to hold on to his kayak so that we looked like a bigger object."

"It was dead calm and very glassy. It was a beautiful day ... then Dean saw this fin come up behind my rudder, just like you see in Jaws, like slowly just coming out of the water. He yelled out and I looked behind my kayak and could see this big fin. It was following me and I wanted to get rid of the lure [even though] it was too close to be going for my lure."

After paddling away, Mr Pennington slowly came to a halt and the shark, which was about 2m long, disappeared under the water.

"Meanwhile a bigger shark [around 4m] appeared so I paddled over to Dean to hold on to his kayak so that we looked like a bigger object."

More info: The New Zealand Herald

Published in Events
Saturday, 12 January 2008 15:53

They've made it!

Tasman Crossing FinishThey made it! I can breath again...

This is a big day for kayaking!

Here is a clip out of the local paper:

The pair stopped paddling their kayak and sat about 10 metres off the beach while local Maori treated them to a rousing haka in front of several thousand onlookers.

Then, they stepped out of their craft - and walked arm-in-arm onto dry land.

The crowding is so severe that authorities have been forced to close all road entrances to the port - forcing onlookers to foot it to the kayak's landing point, Ngamotu Beach.

But they are still pouring to the scene. Several thousand people are waiting at the beach, and many more are lining the lee breakwater at the port's entrance.

"It's absolutely huge - the place is crammed with people," says Taranaki Daily News reporter Leighton Keith, who was aboard a boat following Justin Jones, 24, and James Castrission, 25, as they made their way to the finish.

Small boats, yachts, kayaks, surf club IRBs, coastal vessels, and even the Port Taranaki tugs joined a flotilla that accompanied the pair to the finish - with the tugs are adding to the festive atmosphere by spraying water into the air from their fire-fighting hoses.

More info and video: stuff.co.nz
Published in Trips
Wednesday, 02 January 2008 05:02

German kayaker circles South Island

Freya HoffmeisterA big congratulations goes out to German kayakers, Freya Hoffmeister who become the first woman to circumnavigate the South Island of New Zealand in a kayak.

She battled rough seas and bad weather for 47 days.

Paul Caffyn was there to meet her when she completed the trip. Paul was the first ever to circumnavigate the South Island in a kayak 30 years ago.

This racks up two major circumnavigations in less than a year. We followed Freya on her trip around Iceland back in July 2007 with Greg Stamer.
Published in Trips
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