How did they get that shot?

Monday, 30 June 2008
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Jesse Coombs, runs the 70ft-tall Lower Mesa Falls on Henry's Fork River in Idaho


For those interested in photography, dailymail.co.uk has an interesting article on how professional photographer, Lucas Gilman sets up to get the shot...
Jesse Coombs, runs the 70ft-tall Lower Mesa Falls on Henry's Fork River in Idaho


For those interested in photography, dailymail.co.uk has an interesting article on how professional photographer, Lucas Gilman sets up to get the shot.

He says: 'To get the best shot, you have to get to the best location to shoot, which my be in the base of a gorge.

'You have to rappel in [abseil] and battle slick rocks, snakes, bugs - these are places people don't usually want to go.

'It's not a pleasure cruise. It's hot, humid and usually in a country that doesn't have hospitals readily available, so you are on your own and your team is all you have.'

Every shot he takes involved meticulous planning because the window of opportunity allows no room for failure.

'I try to pre-visualise the shot and usually shoot with two cameras - one acting as a remote - so I have a horizontal and vertical view of almost every situation,' he says.

'There's no second chance with these - you can't ask a guy to go run that 100 footer again.'


More info: dailymail.co.uk
David Johnston

David Johnston

David Johnston has been introducing people to the sport of sea kayaking for the past 15 years. He is a senior instructor trainer with Paddle Canada and teaches for several paddling schools in Ontario, Canada. Full Bio.

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